Detailview updating streamline sex chat

26-Oct-2017 10:57

We'll still need to create URL maps, views and templates.

The main difference is that for the detail pages we'll have the additional challenge of extracting information from patterns in the URL and passing it to the view.

The first is that you will need to include the actual form after the csrf token.

The second has to do with the challenge being really picky on the template code.

Here we'll learn about generic class-based views, and show how they can reduce the amount of code you have to write for common use cases.

We'll also go into URL handling in greater detail, showing how to perform basic pattern matching.

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Possibly the most useful variation is to change/filter the subset of results that are returned — so instead of listing all books you might list top 5 books that were read by other users. List View): model = Book context_object_name = 'my_book_list' # your own name for the list as a template variable queryset = Book.objects.filter(title__icontains='war')[:5] # Get 5 books containing the title war template_name = 'books/my_arbitrary_template_name_list.html' # Specify your own template name/locationclass Book List View(generic.It is expecting a really basic form element but you've added in a couple extra things like the action attribute and a submit button, which the challenge doesn't seem to like.The following code is a trimmed down version of yours, with the addition of the form itself, and it should pass. And yeah I was surprised by this too, especially since Kenneth tends to build out the forms a little more in the videos.We could quite easily write the book list view as a regular function (just like our previous index view), which would query the database for all books, and then call ) — a class that inherits from an existing view.Because the generic view already implements most of the functionality we need, and follows Django best-practice, we will be able to create a more robust list view with less code, less repetition, and ultimately less maintenance.

Possibly the most useful variation is to change/filter the subset of results that are returned — so instead of listing all books you might list top 5 books that were read by other users. List View): model = Book context_object_name = 'my_book_list' # your own name for the list as a template variable queryset = Book.objects.filter(title__icontains='war')[:5] # Get 5 books containing the title war template_name = 'books/my_arbitrary_template_name_list.html' # Specify your own template name/locationclass Book List View(generic.

It is expecting a really basic form element but you've added in a couple extra things like the action attribute and a submit button, which the challenge doesn't seem to like.

The following code is a trimmed down version of yours, with the addition of the form itself, and it should pass. And yeah I was surprised by this too, especially since Kenneth tends to build out the forms a little more in the videos.

We could quite easily write the book list view as a regular function (just like our previous index view), which would query the database for all books, and then call ) — a class that inherits from an existing view.

Because the generic view already implements most of the functionality we need, and follows Django best-practice, we will be able to create a more robust list view with less code, less repetition, and ultimately less maintenance.

For Django class-based views we access an appropriate view function by calling the class method .